Mateo Jarquín: “Reckoning with Revolution in Nicaragua”

‘The Sandinista Front was the first and only armed leftist organization to take power in Latin America after the Cuban Revolution. Their success in 1979 was made possible by an ideologically diverse, “multiclass coalition” which differentiated the Nicaraguan case from failed uprisings elsewhere in the so-called Third World.’

Luam Kidane: “Provocations to rupture and the power to act”

Movements made up of cultural producers and trade unionists, farmers and feminists are calling us to action through the work that they do. Mutual aid initiatives, land occupations and people’s assemblies are setting an example of how movement building practices can help us to break out of the marginalizing and oppressive confines imposed by the neoliberal system.”

Warren Breckman: “Can the Crowd Speak?”

Occupy Wall Street shows that the constituent moment of democracy should include more than merely bodies gathered in public space; that the collective voice is not discovered but invented; that the spectacle of mass gathering and bodies in motion should give way to talking and listening; and that, if the crowd is to speak in a democratic voice, then that voice must be both singular and plural.”

Julie Gibbings: “Unfinished Revolutions and the Politics of Postponement in Guatemala”

“For many Guatemalans, the democratic project of 1944-54 remains unfinished. Historical memories of 1944 continue to offer hope to many Guatemalans who long for a democratic revolution that would overturn the political bankruptcy of the Guatemalan state and inaugurate a more just and inclusive society.  What a new democratic revolution might mean, however, is widely debated.”

Amador Fernández Savater: “Like lost children”

‘Thus, like lost children, we feel our way towards the revolutions of the 21st century. Without ever dissociating again what is wanted and how it is wanted, as in the old question of what to do, where the end justified the most aberrant means, but rather accepting that the means already prefigure the ends or that there are only means, means without ends, “pure means”.’

“Two killed as huge pro-democracy protests continue in Peru”

“Protests have mounted demanding the resignation of Manuel Merino, the former speaker of congress who was sworn in as president on Tuesday, with tens of thousands of people filling the streets of Lima and dozens of towns and cities.”

Tyson Leuchter: “Les Aristocrates, Mangeurs de Peuple: On Zombies, Revolution, and Netflix’s La Révolution”

“La Révolution is a new original series from Netflix, released on 16 October 2020. The first season runs eight episodes. It purports to be an “alternative” telling of the French Revolution of 1789, though apart from the cold open, the vast majority of the action takes place in pre-revolutionary 1787.”

Mohamed Abdou: “Let Empire collapse: why we need a decolonial revolution”

“One year on, Iraq’s revolutionary spirit is still alive”

“On the anniversary of the 2019 October Revolution, Iraqi protesters show a renewed determination to create their own history and shape their own future.”

Leo Jubault: “Memory against History: Black Lives Matter, Identity and the Revolution”

“This is a revolutionary moment; one that needed no parties or state, one that comes, as it often does, from the eruption of the memory of the oppressed. A memory that lies within specific lived experiences, but whose truth and call for justice transcends those specificities. From Rojava to Chiapas, from Yellow Jackets to Black Lives Matter.”