Category Archives: anarchism

Mohamed Abdou: “Let Empire collapse: why we need a decolonial revolution”

Gustavo Rodríguez: “Who do the passionate communards of our time work for?”

“What do contemporary revolts produce? Who do the passionate communards of our day work for? These are probably the initial generating questions that help us to formulate new questions and to list doubts, fears, reflections and proposals, untangling the black threads of our historicity. In this way and only in this way, will we be able to weave the new plot and the warp of the coming struggles. … The new anarchic plots can only come about in a disruptive way, from an ethos that reaffirms the necessary destruction of work and the power of liberating fire. To continue in the repetition and the current stagnation, could take us back in history: to the imposition of global fascism (brown and/or red).”

Andrew Lee: “The revolutionary potential of abolitionist demands”

“If abolition may not be fulfilled by the state, to abolish the police is not a task for the mayor but a task for us. It is necessarily us, the people in the street and the bystanders who may join us, encouraging each other to complete the abolition together. Just as the Occupy movement called not upon the president but upon us to occupy everything, it is we who must enact the abolition. What appears a request for redress is in fact a call to arms.”

Vanessa Taylor: “How Black anarchists are keeping the protest movement alive”

“Black anarchists are striving for a liberation that requires the total upheaval of social order as it stands now.”

James C. Scott interviewed: “What’s So Bad About Anarchy, Anyway?”

“…most revolutions ended up installing a state that was more oppressive than the state that they had destroyed.”

Lorenzo Kom’boa Ervin interviewed on “Ungovernable”

“We as activists, as organizers, have to make ourselves and our communities ungovernable. I know you’ve heard that term before. That means what it says. We have to make it so that we create a new kind of political system of our own, whether it’s dual power or revolutionary direct democracy, whatever we want to call it in this period. We need to create that kind of movement, a mass anti-fascist movement on one hand. And on the other hand, we need to have the capacity on a mass scale to build a community-based mass economic survival tendency, based on cooperatives in the ghetto for housing the poor, rebuilding the cities, and taking care of the material needs of the poor.”

CrimethInc.: ‘The Uprising in Colombia: “An Example of What Is to Come”’

“So people are not just participating in an uprising, people are not just fighting against the system—they are also imagining and they are creating new ways and new perspectives for another kind of society.”

Julius Gavroche: “Dignity: On the George Floyd Rebellion”

There is unrest in every state. A generation is learning what it means to live and fight. The racist urbanism that structured our cities is being torn apart. Landscapes are being reconfigured with the art of distance and the spirit of rebellion. Outside the burning Third Precinct, laughter and speeches. Outside the burning Wendy’s, sideshows with dirt bikes and cars doing donuts. In cities everywhere, fireworks and gunshots in the distance. The mood of this uprising oscillates from rage to exuberance, from celebration to seriousness—somewhere between block party and civil war.”

“Solidarity with the People in the Streets of Portland”

On Thursday, both Trump and his advisor Stephen Miller announced that they will begin deploying armed officers from the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) on the streets of cities that have seen large-scale protests—specifically, cities governed by Democrats.  Trump stated he would “be looking at Seattle, Minneapolis, Portland, and Chicago.”

“From Antifa to Mothers in Helmets, Diverse Elements Fuel Portland Protests”

‘While President Trump on Sunday described the unrest in Portland as a national threat involving “anarchists and agitators,” the protests have featured a wide array of demonstrators, many now galvanized by federal officers exemplifying the militarized enforcement that protesters have long denounced. Gatherings over the weekend grew to upward of 1,000 people — the largest crowds in weeks.’