Category Archives: autonomy

Viewpoint Magazine: “From what Shore does Socialism Arrive?”

“What is necessary then is a political response, based not just on moral commitment, but on an understanding of how migration itself, especially in the caravan’s notable collective and democratic form, is a political challenge to the capitalist state and a refusal to accept the conditions of exploitation offered in the capitalist system. … A political response would thus have to recognize the caravan as both a concrete act of refusal and as a movement of politicization.”

Miguel Amorós interviewed on “The need for a revolutionary orientation”

“A revolutionary, anti-development movement must have a decolonizing orientation, it will have to be directed towards the locality, it will have to have an anti-statist, de-industrializing and autonomous orientation. That is, it must reinforce, during this phase, a horizontal, integral society in the sense that all activities will form part of a whole (politics, economics, education, culture…). Therefore horizontal, autonomous, integrated, fraternal, balanced, egalitarian, anti-patriarchal and decentralized.”

“Raqqa on the way to a new future”

“Following the liberation of the northern Syrian city of Raqqa under the leadership of the YPJ (Women’s Defense Units) in October 2017, the city’s administration was handed over to the Civilian Council.”

Robert D. Taber & Charlton W. Yingling: “Free Communities of Color in the Revolutionary Caribbean”

“Our new book, Free Communities of Color in the Revolutionary Caribbean: Overturning, or Turning Back?, brings together emerging and established scholars to explore meanings of community and belonging for people of color in the late Age of Atlantic Revolutions, not just in Haiti or the British Atlantic, but also Caracas, Cartagena, the Dutch and Swedish Caribbean, and the European metropole.”

“From Rojava to the Mapuche Struggle: The Kurdish Revolutionary Seed Spreads in Latin America”

“The Kurdish seed has already spread through Latin America and it is taking root among activists who are eager to collaborate. Like the Zapatista Army of National Liberation, the Kurdish struggle has inspired the formation of new groups, committees, organizations, and people who share similar experiences, and all appear to join what is just one fight: the struggle for our true freedom.”

“Resistance is Life: Welcome to the Commune”

“The Kurdish people have gone to great efforts to make their revolution an open one, to give both international fighters and civilian internationalists like us the opportunity to come here and learn, and develop the connections we need if we are to form a new internationalism with its roots here in the cradle of civilisation.”

Jackson Lears: “Aquarius Rising”

“Certain years acquire an almost numinous quality in collective memory—1789, 1861, 1914. One of the more recent additions to the list is 1968. Its fiftieth anniversary has brought a flood of attempts to recapture it—local, national, and transnational histories, anthologies, memoirs, even performance art and musical theater.”  Review essay on several books.

Cihad Hammy: “The first commune in Kobane: construction and challenges”

“Despite the challenges and shortcomings of the commune system in Rojava- North Syria, it still remains the best model in Syria that relatively offers the only space for peace, feminism, coexistence and democracy.”

Mathew Little: “Democratic Revolution in Rojava”

“By making stronger connections with activists working at the base level of democratic confederalism; for example the communes, co-operatives and women’s organisations, we can broaden our understanding and begin to forge genuine solidarity and also generate ideas and inspiration for our own movements.”

Philip Argeș O’Keeffe: “Tekmîl: Creating a Culture of Constructive Criticism”

“It is rooted in the aspect of the philosophy of democratic confederalism which emphasizes humility, open-mindedness and progress in all aspects of revolutionary life.”