Category Archives: the common

Laurence Cox: ‘The revolutionary challenge of “the long 1968”’

“The struggles of 1968 remade the landscape of social movements and popular resistance for decades to come. What do these struggles have to tell us today?”

Void Network: ‘Signs of the times/Images from the future: Thoughts on the “yellow vests” and the revolt in France.’

“the question faced by the politicized minorities that still raise red and black flags remains: can we participate in something that exceeds us, in struggles that pose the problem of organization and justice on the level of a historical stake, to find ourselves next to people that we do not agree nor identify with, to risk, to err, to be disappointed? If the answer is negative, we can verbalize about revolution, but we will not be one of its productive vectors.”

Two statements that have appeared amidst the gilets jaunes “movement”

“All contemporary anti-capitalist movements must abandon the self-illusion of being intrinsically opposed to capitalism; whatever such movements may emerge, they will constitute themselves in the very struggle to destroy/escape capital.  The heterogeneity of contemporary social movements also condemns all possibility of representation.  The gilets jaunes possess the virtue of self-consciously embracing this condemnation or refusal.  The question then is what is to follow.”

“Call from the Yellow Vests of Commercy to set up popular assemblies”

‘Here in Commercy, in the Meuse, we have been operating from the beginning with daily popular assemblies, where each person participates equally. We organized to block entrances to the city and service stations, and filtering road blocks. In the process, we built a cabin in the central square. We meet there every day to organize ourselves, decide next actions, interact with people, and welcome those who join the movement. We also organize “solidarity soups” to live beautiful moments  together and get to know each other. In equality.’

Cinzia Arruzza: “From Women’s Strikes to a New Class Movement: The Third Feminist Wave”

“After more than two years of international mobilization … it is clearly time to say that we are in the middle of a new feminist wave. A wave that … as a whole has posed issues such as gender violence, wage inequality, reproductive rights, and women’s reproductive work, as well as sexual liberties, at the center of the political and cultural debate of every country hit by the mobilizations. … The current one is not the fourth or even the fifth feminist wave.”

Miguel Amorós interviewed on “The need for a revolutionary orientation”

“A revolutionary, anti-development movement must have a decolonizing orientation, it will have to be directed towards the locality, it will have to have an anti-statist, de-industrializing and autonomous orientation. That is, it must reinforce, during this phase, a horizontal, integral society in the sense that all activities will form part of a whole (politics, economics, education, culture…). Therefore horizontal, autonomous, integrated, fraternal, balanced, egalitarian, anti-patriarchal and decentralized.”

Madeline Lane-McKinley: “#MeToo from Below”

“The revival of feminism as mass movement is a key feature of the Trump era. Will it be a feminism for elites or a revolutionary feminism from below?”

Ruymán Rodríguez: “The call of anarchism: An identity made in practice”

‘Rodríguez champions an anarchism defined in practice.  But contrary to those who would today give second place to any “anarchist” identity, he contends that it is in this practice where the identity must be affirmed.  The essay is not an apology for blind and hyper-activism, while remaining silent over who one is politically, for fear of frightening others.  It is rather the defense of anarchist practice as anarchist.’

Nicholas Levis: “Three Lessons of Occupy Wall Street, with a Fair Dose of Memory”

‘The story I wish to write now instead is not about how OWS was the beginning of “the movement,” but to identify three reasons why it was one of the most effective catalysts for social justice movements in decades.’

“Resistance is Life: Welcome to the Commune”

“The Kurdish people have gone to great efforts to make their revolution an open one, to give both international fighters and civilian internationalists like us the opportunity to come here and learn, and develop the connections we need if we are to form a new internationalism with its roots here in the cradle of civilisation.”