Category Archives: emergency

Luam Kidane: “Provocations to rupture and the power to act”

Movements made up of cultural producers and trade unionists, farmers and feminists are calling us to action through the work that they do. Mutual aid initiatives, land occupations and people’s assemblies are setting an example of how movement building practices can help us to break out of the marginalizing and oppressive confines imposed by the neoliberal system.”

“One year on, Iraq’s revolutionary spirit is still alive”

“On the anniversary of the 2019 October Revolution, Iraqi protesters show a renewed determination to create their own history and shape their own future.”

Amanda C. Waterhouse: ‘“La Esperanza de América Latina”: The Ongoing Student Revolution in Colombia’

“Continued student organizing shows that student protest is not an add-on to normal political life in Colombia, but a pillar so fundamental that it persists even when the most basic rights erode. Students have long agitated amidst extreme adversity and violence. They have … defended their participation in co-governance within educational institutions, especially universities, and addressed the broader political, economic, and social problems of the country.”

CrimethInc.: “Chile: Looking Back on a Year of Uprising”

“Participation in this wave of revolt is producing the understanding that there is no model of governance in practice anywhere in the world that could offer a solution to the structural violence and alienation we face. At first, many people took to the streets out of rage against police violence or out of feelings of powerlessness and desperation. But we choose to return because we discover that living a dignified life and creating a dignified future necessitate working together to suspend the normal state of affairs. In these moments together, we experiment with new ways to relate to ourselves and the territories we inhabit.”

Frances Fox Piven & Deepak Bhargava: “What If Trump Won’t Leave?”

“If Trump steals the election, a broad united front will have to make the country ungovernable and the reigning regime illegitimate, despite the risks involved. … If an illegitimate election gives rise to civil disorder that cannot be easily suppressed, corporate and political elites will move to dump Trump to protect their interests.”

“‘We Can’t Stand It Anymore’: Bolivian Protesters Demand Quick Elections”

“The highway blockades are organized by labor unions alongside rural and indigenous groups allied to the socialist party of ousted former president Evo Morales.  Last week, they launched an open-ended campaign of strikes, marches and barricades in a bid to pressure Bolivia’s unelected interim government to bring forward presidential elections after electoral authorities twice postponed these, citing the coronavirus.”

Julius Gavroche: “Dignity: On the George Floyd Rebellion”

There is unrest in every state. A generation is learning what it means to live and fight. The racist urbanism that structured our cities is being torn apart. Landscapes are being reconfigured with the art of distance and the spirit of rebellion. Outside the burning Third Precinct, laughter and speeches. Outside the burning Wendy’s, sideshows with dirt bikes and cars doing donuts. In cities everywhere, fireworks and gunshots in the distance. The mood of this uprising oscillates from rage to exuberance, from celebration to seriousness—somewhere between block party and civil war.”

“Solidarity with the People in the Streets of Portland”

On Thursday, both Trump and his advisor Stephen Miller announced that they will begin deploying armed officers from the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) on the streets of cities that have seen large-scale protests—specifically, cities governed by Democrats.  Trump stated he would “be looking at Seattle, Minneapolis, Portland, and Chicago.”

Kate Derickson: “Community Defense in Minneapolis We are not yet after a revolution”

“We are not yet after a revolution and so we are situated in the liminal space of prefiguration. We can imagine it, but we cannot yet make it so. But it might be even harder than this particular tension implies. It might even be the case that to prefigure the world we desire—on the fly, and horizontally—runs the risk of importing the very grammars we wish to abolish.”

“More Precisely Revolution”​: Notes from the Protests Worldwide

“In an ongoing series, The Drift is inviting short reflections on global protest movements. We ask: What are we learning about direct political action in the midst of this unprecedented crisis? What are we risking, and what are we gaining, by gathering together—many of us for the first time in months?”