Category Archives: emergency

“‘The Whole World Is Watching’: The 1968 Democratic Convention, 50 Years Later”

“On Aug. 28, 1968, violent clashes in Chicago between demonstrators and the police produced one of the most polarizing showdowns of the 1960s. People are still debating what it all meant.”

“Nicaragua: A rebellion at a crossroads”

“After three months of demonstrations, blockades, and street fighting, the Ortega government has succeeded in clearing the roads and driving many dissidents and rebels out of the country, but not at suppressing the revolt entirely.”

“What is Happening in Nicaragua Right Now?”

“Nonviolent civil disobedience relies first and foremost on the will of its proponents not to take up arms, and this will seems unbreakable. This is why we must open our eyes to what is happening in Nicaragua. If a transition from dictatorship to democracy can be achieved without a civil war, we will avoid the risk—so often a reality—that from the country’s ruins a new tyrant will rise up to take the place of the tyrant who was violently overthrown.  Achieving change through a civilian uprising will allow us, for the first time, to build stable institutions, develop an independent judicial system, and choose a new government in free and transparent elections. Then we will finally be on the path to modernity.”

Andy Merrifield: ‘“Fulfillment was already there”: Debord & ’68’

“France seemed on the precipice of revolution; a festival of people was glimpsed. Alienation was cast off, momentarily; freedom was real; capitalised time abandoned. Without trains, cars, Metro and work, leisure time was reclaimed, time lived. Students and workers seized the contingent situation, acted spontaneously, created new situations, realising something what no trade union or party could ever do, or wanted to do. And yet, as quickly as things erupted, they were almost as speedily repressed, by state and bourgeoisie, soon backed by the Communists and the CGT. The optimistic promise, the beach beneath the paving stones, had dissipated, for now. The music was over. There was no other side to break on through to.”

“Why the March for Our Lives could win”

“That’s what makes movements like the March for Our Lives — and much of the activism that’s followed the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooting in Parkland, Florida, which killed 17 — so important. For once, we are seeing a mass movement that is extremely dedicated to gun control. And by attracting so much national attention, the movement may inspire other Americans to follow suit — making gun control an issue that can actually sway votes.”

“Drawn to a Cause, British Woman Dies Fighting Alongside Kurds in Syria”

“In Britain, Ms. Campbell, 26, was active in causes like animal rights and environmental protection, but until recently, she had no personal connection to the Kurds. Yet she was deeply moved, family and friends said, by the fight to defend an autonomous, mostly Kurdish region in northern Syria, known as Rojava, whose leaders advocate a secular, democratic and egalitarian politics, with equal rights for women.”

Stephanie Abraham: “Indicting the System”

Khan-Cullors’s book, When They Call You a Terrorist: A Black Lives Matter Memoir, co-written with author and journalist asha bandele, “is about Patrisse Khan-Cullors as much as it is about our current moment, wherein Black people, Muslims, the mentally ill, immigrants, women, trans folks, and others are one fender bender away from being beaten and charged with terrorism. The authors make clear that each of us needs to answer the question: what will I do when they call me a terrorist — because who among us won’t be?”

“Steve Bannon Thinks the Golden Globes Signal the End of the Patriarchy”

“It’s a Cromwell moment!” Bannon shouted … “It’s even more powerful than populism. It’s deeper. It’s primal. It’s elemental. The long black dresses and all that—this is the Puritans! It’s anti-patriarchy.”

Valerio Starita: “L’autonomie s’organise”

The French movement against the ‘Labour Law’ “last year was a movement in revolt against precarity, a movement which was crystallised by the Labour Law, and which was quickly redoubled by a wide movement in revolt against police repression, owing to the particular context it had to face – namely, the state of emergency. This was the context in which we saw autonomous contingents forming on the protests, bringing together as many as several thousand people.”

Amitai Etzioni & Mark Bray on the Antifa

Is violence a legitimate political tool?