Category Archives: emergency

Jeffery R. Webber & Forrest Hylton interviewed on the Coup in Bolivia

“In a regional perspective, we might situate the Bolivian coup more or less mid-way between the “hard” military coup in Honduras in 2009, and the “soft” parliamentary coups against Fernando Lugo in Paraguay in 2012 and Dilma Rousseff in Brazil in 2016, with a crucial difference—in Bolivia, the far right co-opted and hijacked mass centrist protest by urban middle classes that preceded the coup, pushing it in a violent direction.”

Raul Zibechi: “Bolivia: The Extreme Right Takes Advantage of a Popular Uprising”

“If there is anything left of ethics and dignity in the Latin American left, we should be reflecting on power, and the abuses committed in its exercise. As feminists and Indigenous people have taught us, power is always oppressive, colonial and patriarchal. That is why they reject leaders (caudillos), and why communities rotate their leaders so that they don’t accumulate power. We cannot forget that in this moment there is a serious danger that the racist, colonial and patriarchal right manages to take advantage of this situation to impose rule and provoke a bloodbath.”

“This May Be The Largest Wave Of Nonviolent Mass Movements In World History. What Comes Next?”

“Around the globe, mass nonviolent protests are demanding that national leaders step down. Evo Morales, Bolivia’s three-term leftist president, is the latest casualty of mass demonstrations, after being abandoned by the military. Beyond Bolivia, people are rising up against their governments in places as varied as Chile, Lebanon, Ecuador, Argentina, Hong Kong, Iraq and Britain. This follows remarkable protests in Sudan and Algeria in the spring, in which protest movements effectively toppled entrenched dictators, and in Puerto Rico, where a mass movement deposed an unpopular governor. Beyond Puerto Rico, the United States has also hosted a steady stream of protest since January 2017 against the Trump administration and its policies.”

lundi matin: “Thoughts for times of rebellion”

“The destitution of the present state of things is not only destruction. It is at the same time the emergence of new places, the creation of forms. It is a process that builds. In the revolts against this world, moving from country to country, rushing from city to city, the destituent process remains open.”

“Lebanon’s ‘October Revolution’ must go on!”

Lebanon has a golden opportunity for the formation of an alternative, we should not let the ruling class reproduce itself again.”

Richard Youngs: “After Protest: Pathways beyond Mass Mobilization”

‘The case studies show that the standard criticism that activists singularly fail to move “from protest to politics” is no longer entirely fair—even if this might have been valid to some extent a decade or more ago. Yet they also suggest that maintaining effective postprotest activism can be far harder than organizing an influential protest and that all postprotest pathways easily encounter serious obstacles.’

“From Chile to Lebanon, Protests Flare over Wallet Issues” (NYT)

“Small pocketbook items became the focus of popular fury across the globe in recent weeks, as frustrated citizens filled the streets for unexpected protests that tapped into a wellspring of bubbling frustration at a class of political elites seen as irredeemably corrupt or hopelessly unjust or both. They followed mass demonstrations in Bolivia, Spain, Iraq and Russia and before that the Czech Republic, Algeria, Sudan and Kazakhstan in what has been a steady drumbeat of unrest over the past few months.”

“Do today’s global protests have anything in common?” (BBC)

“In recent weeks, mass protests have broken out in countries from Lebanon to Spain to Chile. All are different – with distinct causes, methods and goals – but there are some common themes that connect them.  While thousands of miles apart, protests have begun for similar reasons in several countries, and some have taken inspiration from each other on how to organise and advance their goals.”

“Chile under a state of emergency”

‘Every protest against inequality, or the perceived assault on former “equality” and the arrogance and blindness of politicians, is today a potential spark for rebellion and insurrection. Today it is chile, lebanon, hong kong; just yesterday, it was ecuador, haiti, nicaragua, france. And if we push back the calendar to the beginning of this century, then it may rightfully be said, with Alain Badiou, that we live in times of riots.’

“Ecuador moves government out of capital as violent protests rage”

President “Moreno, 66, who has moved away from the leftwing policies of his predecessor and one-time mentor Rafael Correa, has said he will neither tolerate disorder nor overturn the scrapping of fuel subsidies as part of a package of austerity measures.”