Category Archives: emergency

Julius Gavroche: “Dignity: On the George Floyd Rebellion”

There is unrest in every state. A generation is learning what it means to live and fight. The racist urbanism that structured our cities is being torn apart. Landscapes are being reconfigured with the art of distance and the spirit of rebellion. Outside the burning Third Precinct, laughter and speeches. Outside the burning Wendy’s, sideshows with dirt bikes and cars doing donuts. In cities everywhere, fireworks and gunshots in the distance. The mood of this uprising oscillates from rage to exuberance, from celebration to seriousness—somewhere between block party and civil war.”

“Solidarity with the People in the Streets of Portland”

On Thursday, both Trump and his advisor Stephen Miller announced that they will begin deploying armed officers from the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) on the streets of cities that have seen large-scale protests—specifically, cities governed by Democrats.  Trump stated he would “be looking at Seattle, Minneapolis, Portland, and Chicago.”

Kate Derickson: “Community Defense in Minneapolis We are not yet after a revolution”

“We are not yet after a revolution and so we are situated in the liminal space of prefiguration. We can imagine it, but we cannot yet make it so. But it might be even harder than this particular tension implies. It might even be the case that to prefigure the world we desire—on the fly, and horizontally—runs the risk of importing the very grammars we wish to abolish.”

“More Precisely Revolution”​: Notes from the Protests Worldwide

“In an ongoing series, The Drift is inviting short reflections on global protest movements. We ask: What are we learning about direct political action in the midst of this unprecedented crisis? What are we risking, and what are we gaining, by gathering together—many of us for the first time in months?”

CrimethInc.: “Snapshots from the Uprising: Accounts from Three Weeks of Countrywide Revolt”

“In the following analysis, we review the series of movements that led to the uprising in response to the murder of George Floyd, explore the factors that made the uprising so powerful, discuss the threats facing it, and conclude with a series of accounts from participants in Minneapolis, New York City, Richmond, Grand Rapids, Austin, Seattle, and elsewhere around the country.”

“Today’s Activism: Spontaneous, Leaderless, but Not Without Aim”

“Welcome to 21st-century activism, where spontaneous and leaderless movements have been defined by their organic births and guided on the fly by people whose preferences, motivations and ideas may not always align.”

CrimethInc: “What Will It Take to Stop the Police from Killing?”

“So what will it take for us to end police murders once and for all? Nothing short of revolutionBut that revolution isn’t a distant utopia, or a single spasm in which we storm the Winter Palace. It’s an ongoing process of building relationships, sharing resources, defending ourselves, undoing the interlocking structures of white supremacy, and organizing to meet our needs together without police or politicians—and it’s already happening.”

Anonymous: “Between Looted Targets And Trillionaires: Solidarity With The Rebels In Minneapolis”

The order of things is crushing us. Our jobs are disappearing, they’re paying us shit for throwing our lives into a charnel house, they’re murdering the unruly in the streets and stealing the lives of black people on camera for all the world to see. This is a world we must refuse because it never gave a damn thing for us. This is a world we must destroy.”

Julius Gavroche: “Chronicles from Lebanon’s revolution”

“Since October 17, 2019, Lebanon has been living at the rhythm of an uprising targeting both the political class and a moribund economic regime. As elsewhere, the spread of the virus and the health emergency measures first put an end to the contestation. … Despite a quarantine in effect until the 10th of May, movements are taking to the streets, and once again targeting banks that are crystallising discontent.”

Dietrich Hoss: “What can, what must keep us standing: About revolutionary ethics”

“Everywhere it has become clear to many people something that we have learned with difficulty: there is nothing and no one to trust; neither the laws of history, nor party-churches. We can only trust ourselves; we can only hold on alone, with accomplices, on the basis of revolutionary ethics. In the face of the external and internal enemy, never give up, no conciliation or accommodation; identify positions and maneuvers, and gain self-control as one tries to conquer places outside.”