Category Archives: fraternity

Miguel Amorós interviewed on “The need for a revolutionary orientation”

“A revolutionary, anti-development movement must have a decolonizing orientation, it will have to be directed towards the locality, it will have to have an anti-statist, de-industrializing and autonomous orientation. That is, it must reinforce, during this phase, a horizontal, integral society in the sense that all activities will form part of a whole (politics, economics, education, culture…). Therefore horizontal, autonomous, integrated, fraternal, balanced, egalitarian, anti-patriarchal and decentralized.”

Madeline Lane-McKinley: “#MeToo from Below”

“The revival of feminism as mass movement is a key feature of the Trump era. Will it be a feminism for elites or a revolutionary feminism from below?”

Rebecca Solnit: “All the Rage: What a literature that embraces female anger can achieve”

“Instead of a theory of male anger, we have a growing literature in essays and now books about female anger, a phenomenon in transition.” Rebecca Solnit on three new books about women’s anger.

Dilar Dirik: “Women’s Internationalism against Global Patriarchy”

“From the earliest rebellions in history to the first organized women’s strikes, protests and movements, struggling women have always acted in the consciousness that their resistance is linked to wider issues of injustice and oppression in society.  Whether in the fight against colonialism, religious dogma, militarism, industrialism, state authority or capitalist modernity, historically women’s movements have mobilized the experience of different aspects of oppression and the need for a fight on multiple fronts.”

Carlos Lozada: “Why women’s rage is healthy, rational and necessary for America”

GOOD AND MAD: The Revolutionary Power of Women’s Anger by Rebecca Traister. Simon & Schuster. 284 pp. (2018)

RAGE BECOMES HER: The Power of Women’s Anger by Soraya Chemaly. Atria Books. 392 pp. (2018)

Mathew Little: “Democratic Revolution in Rojava”

“By making stronger connections with activists working at the base level of democratic confederalism; for example the communes, co-operatives and women’s organisations, we can broaden our understanding and begin to forge genuine solidarity and also generate ideas and inspiration for our own movements.”

Philip Argeș O’Keeffe: “Tekmîl: Creating a Culture of Constructive Criticism”

“It is rooted in the aspect of the philosophy of democratic confederalism which emphasizes humility, open-mindedness and progress in all aspects of revolutionary life.”

“Love and revolution” (2018): A film by Yannis Youlountas

A documentary film-testimony of struggles for autonomy in Greece, letting those who are directly engaged in these struggles speak for themselves.

Davide Turcato: “Italian Anarchism as a Transnational Movement, 1885-1915”

Transnationalism was thus a key feature of the anarchist movement, which significantly contributed to its sustainability. In times of repression, Italian anarchism abroad provided continuity to the movement that had been beheaded in the homeland, and its press abroad took up the task of carrying on propaganda in the Italian language. However, transnationalism was not just an emergency mode of operation in exceptional times. Rather, it was a built-in characteristic of the movement, closely related to the nature of anarchist tactics. Italian anarchists were fully aware of the role of transnationalism and intentionally relied on it”

Asad Haider interviewed on “How Identity Politics has Divided the Left”

“What was once intended as a revolutionary strategy to take down interlocking oppressions has become a nebulous but charged buzzword co-opted across the political spectrum.”