Category Archives: freedom

CrimethInc: “The Cop-Free Zone: Reflections from Experiments in Autonomy around the US”

“The cop-free zone is not the particular block or traffic circle or park. It is the shared commitment to defending a space and eliminating the dynamics of policing and white supremacy.  In the following collection, we explore some people’s experiences attempting to create police-free autonomous zones in different parts of the United States.”

Kristian Williams: ‘“Full Spectrum Resistance”: a field manual for insurgencies’

“Aric McBay’s massive, two-volume, handbook for political action, covers the fundamentals of social change, offering advice on organization, strategy, tactics, security, communication (internal and external), and so on — all illustrated with historical case studies.”

CrimethInc.: “Snapshots from the Uprising: Accounts from Three Weeks of Countrywide Revolt”

“In the following analysis, we review the series of movements that led to the uprising in response to the murder of George Floyd, explore the factors that made the uprising so powerful, discuss the threats facing it, and conclude with a series of accounts from participants in Minneapolis, New York City, Richmond, Grand Rapids, Austin, Seattle, and elsewhere around the country.”

Peter Gelderloos: “Questions In The Face Of Counterinsurgency”

Liberal identity politics, in contrast to radical resistance against the multiple, overlapping forms of oppression that exist in our society, is ultimately about turning oppressed people into demographics to be exploited for power struggles within the dominant institutions. It is about representation. To be represented, a people must be simplified, they must be homogenized, borders must be drawn around them to determine who has membership and who does not, and then that entire body must be further disciplined, bribed, and silenced until they accept the political views that belong to their representatives.”

“Reading the History of Slavery: 3 Experts Offer Book Recommendations”

On the ways the history of slavery informs our present.

CrimethInc.: “This Is Anarchy”

“Eight Ways the Black Lives Matter and Justice for George Floyd Uprisings Reflect Anarchist Ideas in Action.”

Asad Haider: “No Justice, No Peace”

‘The disturbance of the peace will continue as long as there is injustice; so “no justice, no peace,” is a slogan which represents the intransigent pursuit of justice, against all the forces of containment wielded by the state, against the voices of the white moderates who would blame protestors for the violence of the police, and against all those who fail to grasp King’s lasting message that a politics of overcoming injustice is a politics of revolutionary change.’

“Gun-toting members of the Boogaloo movement are showing up at protests”

Boogaloo members appear to hold conflicting ideological views with some identifying as anarchists and others rejecting formal titles. Some pockets of the group have espoused white supremacy while others reject it. But they have at least two things in common: an affinity for toting around guns in public and a “boogaloo” rallying cry, which is commonly viewed as code for another US civil war.’

William C. Anderson: “We defend ourselves so we can all breathe in peace”

“These events, revolts and rebellions like the ones taking place in the streets this very moment, are not the revolution itself. They are singular events in a long process that eventually can lead to a revolutionary struggle, which in itself is a substantial undertaking.”

Asad Haider: “Pessimism of the Will”

“Optimism of the intellect, because we have to start by recognizing that all people are capable of thought, that they are able to not only form conceptions of the world but also to experiment with new possibilities. … But pessimism of the will, because we know that the will has to take a material organizational form, and that across the history of revolutionary politics the classical form assumed by the young Gramsci is no longer available to us. We lack the concrete basis for organizations on the model of the twentieth century revolutions, and we know from the history which followed these revolutions that the emancipatory potential of the party seizing the state has been exhausted. … Our subjective horizon is the optimism of the intellect; our objective, structuring condition is pessimism of the will. Without optimism of the intellect, we have the party without the people. Without pessimism of the will, we have the illusion of power. Until we recognize this there is no path for action.”