Category Archives: freedom

“From Rojava to the Mapuche Struggle: The Kurdish Revolutionary Seed Spreads in Latin America”

“The Kurdish seed has already spread through Latin America and it is taking root among activists who are eager to collaborate. Like the Zapatista Army of National Liberation, the Kurdish struggle has inspired the formation of new groups, committees, organizations, and people who share similar experiences, and all appear to join what is just one fight: the struggle for our true freedom.”

“Resistance is Life: Welcome to the Commune”

“The Kurdish people have gone to great efforts to make their revolution an open one, to give both international fighters and civilian internationalists like us the opportunity to come here and learn, and develop the connections we need if we are to form a new internationalism with its roots here in the cradle of civilisation.”

“What is Happening in Nicaragua Right Now?”

“Nonviolent civil disobedience relies first and foremost on the will of its proponents not to take up arms, and this will seems unbreakable. This is why we must open our eyes to what is happening in Nicaragua. If a transition from dictatorship to democracy can be achieved without a civil war, we will avoid the risk—so often a reality—that from the country’s ruins a new tyrant will rise up to take the place of the tyrant who was violently overthrown.  Achieving change through a civilian uprising will allow us, for the first time, to build stable institutions, develop an independent judicial system, and choose a new government in free and transparent elections. Then we will finally be on the path to modernity.”

John Ferling: “Forget a new civil war. We need a new American revolution.”

“More than 200 years later, the United States may well be losing the American Revolution.”

Wayne Price: “Some Lessons from Revolutionary History”

“A review of Loren Goldner’s Revolution, Defeat, and Theoretical Underdevelopment: Russia, Turkey, Spain, Bolivia (2017), a book by a libertarian Marxist sympathetic to anarchism who analyses four revolutions in the 20th century and discusses their lessons.”

Yoav Di-Capua Interviewed on “Revolution and Arab Existentialism in the Era of Decolonization”

Revolution is a response to the immense effort to decolonize self and society and engender an ontological shift away from cultural and mental structures, and assumptions of colonial modernity. To understand this connection we need to be mindful of the fact that these revolutions are directed internally as a purifying and a regenerative force.”

Davide Turcato: “Italian Anarchism as a Transnational Movement, 1885-1915”

Transnationalism was thus a key feature of the anarchist movement, which significantly contributed to its sustainability. In times of repression, Italian anarchism abroad provided continuity to the movement that had been beheaded in the homeland, and its press abroad took up the task of carrying on propaganda in the Italian language. However, transnationalism was not just an emergency mode of operation in exceptional times. Rather, it was a built-in characteristic of the movement, closely related to the nature of anarchist tactics. Italian anarchists were fully aware of the role of transnationalism and intentionally relied on it”

Todd Gitlin: “The Missing Music of the Left “

‘If there are to be global goals, goals that cross boundaries to inspire the multitudes, where might they be found? … So should idealists across borders persist in seeking the universalist grail—the moral equivalent of “The Internationale”? Some settle for anti-fascism; others strive to resurrect the lost traditions of anarchism and anarcho-syndicalism; a few scavenge among the ruins of communism. Nearly three decades after the collapse of the communist phantasm, the left has still not recovered its voice, let alone composed a melody you can’t get out of your head.’

Paula Erizanu: “The Revolutionary Sex”

“For one shining moment, being a Russian woman meant sexual freedom and radical equality. Never seen before – or since.”

Jamil Khader: “Liberal Politics and the Challenge of White Supremacy: Anti-anti-Eurocentrism and the Question of Identity Politics”

‘Liberal and leftist commentators thus need to draw the ultimate radical conclusion from this anti-anti-Eurocentric position: The struggle for racial justice must be grounded in a dialectical materialist understanding of “the gap” between the particular and the universal which, according to the Slovenian philosopher Slavoj Žižek, not only destabilizes identity from within, but also serves as the foundation for a true universality. Žižek’s crucial point here is that identities should be taken up on the promise of actualizing this immanent universal dimension that was opened up precisely through the brutal history of genocide, slavery, colonialism, internment, etc.’