Category Archives: gender

Raquel Varela: “Learning from Portugal’s Carnation Revolution”

“A revolution took place in Portugal. We can date this precisely: between April 25, 1974 and November 25, 1975. The revolution was the most profound to have taken place in Europe since the Second World War. During those 19 months, hundreds of thousands of workers went on strike, hundreds of workplaces were occupied sometimes for months and perhaps almost three million people took part in demonstrations, occupations and commissions. A great many workplaces were taken over and run by the workers.  Land in much of southern and central Portugal was taken over by the workers themselves. Women won, almost overnight, a host of concessions and made massive strides towards equal pay and equality. Thousands of houses were occupied. Tens of thousands of soldiers rebelled.”

Cinzia Arruzza & Paula Varela: “Long Live the Women’s Committee”

“A dispatch from an embattled worker-run factory in Buenos Aires, where a militant women’s committee has linked the fight in the factory to the broader feminist struggle beyond its doors.”

“‘Inspiring’ protester becomes symbol of resistance for Sudanese women”

“The image is striking: a young woman, alone, standing above the crowd, urging them on with songs of revolution.”

Sara Salem: “Trajectories of Anticolonialism in Egypt”

“The forms of solidarity imagined by radical groups such as Egyptian feminists, workers, and students often broke free of the exclusionary imaginary of the nation state that always came back to exert itself on the articulations of leaders and state representatives. While both ends of this spectrum within anticolonial movements called for decolonization that was global, the ways in which they imagined this was vastly different.”

Marilyn La Jeunesse: “The History of Las Soldaderas, the Women Who Made the Mexican Revolution Possible”

“For the revolutionaries, the war was an opportunity to overthrow the outdated class system put in place by the Spanish elite. These revolutionaries saw it as a time for Mexico to reward the people who worked the land, not the other way around: a war for the mestizos; a war for the indigenous; and a war for the poor. But neither side could have endured for nearly 10 years without the dedication of Las Soldaderas.”

Mohammed Elnaiem: “Did Kongolese Catholicism Lead to Slave Revolutions?”

“The legacy of Kimpa Vita, a Kongolese woman Catholic mystic, was felt from the U.S. to Haiti.”

Ines Schwerdtner: “One, Two, Many Rosa Luxemburgs”

“On the 100th anniversary of her murder, Rosa Luxemburg’s incredible life provides us with a model — not necessarily of what to do, but of how to do it.”

Cinzia Arruzza: “From Women’s Strikes to a New Class Movement: The Third Feminist Wave”

“After more than two years of international mobilization … it is clearly time to say that we are in the middle of a new feminist wave. A wave that … as a whole has posed issues such as gender violence, wage inequality, reproductive rights, and women’s reproductive work, as well as sexual liberties, at the center of the political and cultural debate of every country hit by the mobilizations. … The current one is not the fourth or even the fifth feminist wave.”

“Raqqa on the way to a new future”

“Following the liberation of the northern Syrian city of Raqqa under the leadership of the YPJ (Women’s Defense Units) in October 2017, the city’s administration was handed over to the Civilian Council.”

Robert D. Taber & Charlton W. Yingling: “Free Communities of Color in the Revolutionary Caribbean”

“Our new book, Free Communities of Color in the Revolutionary Caribbean: Overturning, or Turning Back?, brings together emerging and established scholars to explore meanings of community and belonging for people of color in the late Age of Atlantic Revolutions, not just in Haiti or the British Atlantic, but also Caracas, Cartagena, the Dutch and Swedish Caribbean, and the European metropole.”