Category Archives: power

Jennifer Gonzalez Covarrubias: “A Mexican indigenous town’s environmental revolt”

“The indigenous town of Cheran is practically an independent enclave tucked into the lawless mountains of western Mexico.  Its residents have their own system of government based on community assemblies.”

“36 Powerful Images Of Women Protesters Leading From The Front Across The World”

“Celebrating the power and courage of all the women and girls across the world who have to taken to the streets for their beliefs in gender equality, violence and democratic values.”

ROAR Collective: A Dual Power Reading List

An anthology from the magazine.

William Dalrymple: Review of “The Buried” by Peter Hessler – Life, death and revolution in Egypt

‘In this scheme, the fall of Mubarak, the chaos of the Muslim Brotherhood, and the restoration of authoritarian rule under Sisi also follow rhythms familiar to Egyptian history. Hessler sees a mirror in the story of the pharoah Akhenaten – a failed revolutionary whose attempt to introduce monotheism was crushed in “what was possibly the first military coup in human history” by his general Horemheb, and whose tyranny was consolidated by Horemheb’s successor Ramesses II.’

Joseph Choonara: “A new cycle of revolt”

“This is the third cycle of struggle since the turn of the century. The first, from the late 1990s until the mid-2000s, saw the development of movements against corporate globalisation and neoliberalism. … A second cycle developed in 2011. In Europe it was reflected in occupations of public squares by movements … The claim that a third cycle of revolt is now emerging should be qualified in two ways. First, the struggles do not constitute a coordinated movement. … Second, none of the cycles mentioned above are universal in scope.”

lundi matin: “A strange time/weather”

“Furio Jesi distinguishes between revolt and revolution, which cut across two different times. Revolt is not an aborted revolution. Revolt is the time of myth, a time that bursts in, that breaks historical causality. … The revolutionary parties or any structured organisation are thus incapable of taking part in the revolt and even less of directing it because their actions are part of the long time, of causal time, where each act is taken in the game of means and ends. Each action has a purpose and a certain effectiveness. Revolt suspends this machine of means and ends, this mechanical calculation of the movements of revolutionaries and the reactions of the adversary. We throw ourselves headlong into the revolt. We go there with method and patience in the revolution.”

Bree Busk: “The popular assemblies at the heart of the Chilean uprising”

“Chile has a long history of radical neighborhood organizing — a tradition that is now put at the service of drafting a new constitution for a country in turmoil.”

Daniel Denvir: “Today’s Socialist Revival Began on the Streets of Seattle 20 Years Ago”

The global justice movement exploded onto the scene in protests against the Seattle WTO meetings twenty years ago today. The movement was far from perfect, but its anarchist, direct action-oriented politics were crucial learning experiences for a left that has today finally found its footing.”

Nikos Vrantsis: “Exarchia or How to Frame a Revolution”

“We need to start using words once more. Perhaps this reflection on Exarchia could be the triggering effect for us to talk about the problem of cities, with our focus on our collective problems: the epidemic of loneliness, political disenchantment, environmental degradation, commercialisation of neighbourhoods and cities.”

“Chronicle of an insurrection: Lebanon”

“Since October 17, Lebanon has experienced countrywide demonstrations that have toppled the prime minister and transformed Lebanese society. These demonstrations are part of a global wave of uprisings including EcuadorChile, Honduras, Haiti, Sudan, Iraq, Hong Kong, and Catalunya, in which the exploited and oppressed are challenging the legitimacy of their rulers.”