Category Archives: resistance

Peter Gelderloos: “Debunking the myths around nonviolent resistance”

“As we go forward into the difficult times ahead, we need to remember our own histories, we need to hold high the examples of the George Floyd uprising and Standing Rock, and we need to remember earlier movements like the long history of resistance against slavery and segregation, the workers’ struggles that led to what few labor protections we have today, the Stonewall Riots and anticolonial struggles across the world. Not the whitewashed versions sold back to us, but the actual, complex memories of those who participated.”

“Belarus’ Lukashenko carries assault rifle as protesters demand his resignation at mass rally”

“Tens of thousands of protesters marched in Belarus’ capital city of Minsk over the weekend, demanding the resignation of President Alexander Lukashenko following his contested re-election earlier this month.  Demonstrators marched toward Lukashenko’s residence at the Independence Square on Sunday, brandishing red and white flags to symbolize their opposition to the president and chanting for the long-time ruler to step down and for new elections to be held.”

Frances Fox Piven & Deepak Bhargava: “What If Trump Won’t Leave?”

“If Trump steals the election, a broad united front will have to make the country ungovernable and the reigning regime illegitimate, despite the risks involved. … If an illegitimate election gives rise to civil disorder that cannot be easily suppressed, corporate and political elites will move to dump Trump to protect their interests.”

Richard Kreitner & Rick Perlstein: “A Brief History of Dangerous Others”

“Why do those in positions of authority blame disorder on outside agitators?”

Asad Haider interviewed on The Emancipation of All: Marxism in the Age of Identity Politics

“you advocate for a notion of insurgent universality as a necessary component of emancipatory politics. You write that this notion manifests itself in acts of insurgency that demand emancipation not only for those involved, but for all of the oppressed. “

“Solidarity with the People in the Streets of Portland”

On Thursday, both Trump and his advisor Stephen Miller announced that they will begin deploying armed officers from the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) on the streets of cities that have seen large-scale protests—specifically, cities governed by Democrats.  Trump stated he would “be looking at Seattle, Minneapolis, Portland, and Chicago.”

“From Antifa to Mothers in Helmets, Diverse Elements Fuel Portland Protests”

‘While President Trump on Sunday described the unrest in Portland as a national threat involving “anarchists and agitators,” the protests have featured a wide array of demonstrators, many now galvanized by federal officers exemplifying the militarized enforcement that protesters have long denounced. Gatherings over the weekend grew to upward of 1,000 people — the largest crowds in weeks.’

Jade Begay: “Prolonged Uprising Is the New Normal”

“This is the new normal. Let’s keep it up. Let’s keep protesting, let’s keep unlearning and relearning, let’s keep honoring and respecting BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, people of color) leadership, let’s keep voting, let’s keep dismantling white supremacy within ourselves, our families, our workplaces, our institutions, and our government. Let’s keep moving resources from the police into Black and Brown communities. Let’s keep building the movement, making it stronger and bigger until we abolish the police and ICE and eradicate racism and white supremacy.”

Kate Derickson: “Community Defense in Minneapolis We are not yet after a revolution”

“We are not yet after a revolution and so we are situated in the liminal space of prefiguration. We can imagine it, but we cannot yet make it so. But it might be even harder than this particular tension implies. It might even be the case that to prefigure the world we desire—on the fly, and horizontally—runs the risk of importing the very grammars we wish to abolish.”

“More Precisely Revolution”​: Notes from the Protests Worldwide

“In an ongoing series, The Drift is inviting short reflections on global protest movements. We ask: What are we learning about direct political action in the midst of this unprecedented crisis? What are we risking, and what are we gaining, by gathering together—many of us for the first time in months?”