Category Archives: revolt

Gabriel Bristow: “Yellow fever: Populist pangs in France”

“The movement has remained relatively resolute in its negativity. The refusal to negotiate with the government and the rejection of representation and ‘recuperation’ by political parties is near total. … The gilets jaunes have invented a repertoire of action from next to nothing, settling on roundabouts (precisely where things are supposed to circulate) and storming the nation’s symbols of luxury and power every Saturday. And this repertoire … ultimately prevailed over any single political orientation or strategy.”

Verónica Gago: “Eight Theses on the Feminist Revolution”

“1. The tool of the feminist strike maps new forms of the exploitation of bodies and territories from a perspective that is simultaneously that of visibilization and insubordination. The strike reveals the heterogeneous composition of labor in a feminist register, recognizing tasks that have historically been disregarded, showing its current imbrication with generalized precarization and appropriating a traditional tool of struggle to overflow and reinvent it.”

Raoul Vaneigem interviewed On alienation, the Situationists and everyday revolution

“The movement of self-managing assemblies that is emerging today is the heir (though it is not yet fully aware of it) of all the struggles for emancipation that have shaken history. Where they stopped, where they were crushed, they will resume and, without even mentioning victory or defeat, they will start again without interruption, like the life that inspires them.”

“The Zapatista Army of National Liberation Announces Creation of New Rebel Municipalities”

‘The Zapatista Army of National Liberation (EZLN) published Saturday a statement to report the creation of new rebel and autonomous municipalities in different areas within the southwestern state of Chiapas in Mexico.  The communiqué announced the foundation of Centers of Autonomous Resistance and Zapatista Rebellion, which will comprehend “caracoles” (autonomous organized Zapatista regions), “good” government councils, and autonomous municipalities.  The total number of “caracoles” will thus increase from the five originals to sixteen, which summed up with the 27 municipalities, will represent a total of 43 Zapatista centers. “This exponential growth, which allows us to jump over the fence, is due to the organizational and political work of the Zapatista women, men, children and elderly.”’

“Looking back-forward at the gilets jaunes: A taking stock”

“We share an unfinished debate on the yellow vests’ movement, on what is or was radical within it, and where it failed, if indeed it did so. We begin with a critical appraisal of the movement, followed by a more apologetic note, and in turn a response.  What separates the two sides of this debate is an interpretation or analysis of capitalism.”

Jacques Rancière interviewed on “The singularity of rebellion and autonomy”

“The only real inheritance which we have today is the inheritance left by momentary movements. There is no inheritance of the parties of the Left, nor of the revolutionary parties that barely get a few percentages points in elections. … The ephemeral is what breaks the course of time of domination and what leaves an inheritance.”

A.O. Scott: “Review: ‘Edge of Democracy’ Looks at Brazil with Outrage and Heartbreak”

‘One of the implications of “The Edge of Democracy” is that as Lula and the Workers’ Party lost touch with the mass movement that brought them to power and mastered the levers of the political system, they made themselves vulnerable to popular anger on the right. Corruption and back room dealing were longstanding norms of Brazilian governance that the party didn’t do much to challenge.’

“A new Arab Spring?”

“East London rs21 held a meeting in May 2019 on the uprisings in Algeria, Sudan and Morocco. The speakers discussed the movements demanding change, the counter-revolutionary forces lining up against them, and the role of international solidarity.

Bernard E. Harcourt: “Compagnon de route [Fellow Traveler]”

‘So for now, rather than put on the yellow vest, I would take on the mantle of “companion de route” – fellow traveler, like those who, famously, in the twentieth century, did not join the Communist Party, but sympathized with the aims and goals of Communists and were willing to work with the movement.’

Etienne Balibar: “‘Gilets jaunes’: the meaning of the confrontation”

“That is how democracy is invented and perhaps, at the end of the day, how a regime can change. It is not a long road from the roundabout to the town hall, via the public square, which does not mean it is easy to travel. Demonstrations, popular assemblies, municipal counter-power, États Généraux or their modern equivalent, such is perhaps the squaring of the circle; it must be resolved on a daily basis and over the coming weeks, probably quite quickly, so that a political idea that everyone now needs can emerge from a revolt that no one had expected.”