Category Archives: revolt

Mehmet Döşemeci & Jennifer Thomson: “Decolonizing society: The legacy of 1968”

“The broad-based anti-imperialist consensus animating 1968 New Left politics allowed activists to identify their shared fight against a common enemy — one whose appearance varied, but whose operations were the same. It allowed them to connect the oppression of different national and sub-national communities, and then to move further and struggle against the interconnection of domestic policing with international warmaking. It allowed them to escape their individual isolation by talking and acting collectively. As importantly, it enabled them to draw connections across national and identitarian grammars of discontent.”

“50 Years later, Troubles still Cast ‘Huge Shadow’ over Northern Ireland”

The Irish Troubles (1968-98)

“The Photos that Captured the First Day of the Soviet Invasion of Czechoslovakia”

August 21, 1968 at the Czech Center New York features 20 images of dynamic photo-reportage capturing the first day of the Soviet Invasion of Czechoslovakia.”

Rebecca Solnit: “All the Rage: What a literature that embraces female anger can achieve”

“Instead of a theory of male anger, we have a growing literature in essays and now books about female anger, a phenomenon in transition.” Rebecca Solnit on three new books about women’s anger.

Dilar Dirik: “Women’s Internationalism against Global Patriarchy”

“From the earliest rebellions in history to the first organized women’s strikes, protests and movements, struggling women have always acted in the consciousness that their resistance is linked to wider issues of injustice and oppression in society.  Whether in the fight against colonialism, religious dogma, militarism, industrialism, state authority or capitalist modernity, historically women’s movements have mobilized the experience of different aspects of oppression and the need for a fight on multiple fronts.”

Jackson Lears: “Aquarius Rising”

“Certain years acquire an almost numinous quality in collective memory—1789, 1861, 1914. One of the more recent additions to the list is 1968. Its fiftieth anniversary has brought a flood of attempts to recapture it—local, national, and transnational histories, anthologies, memoirs, even performance art and musical theater.”  Review essay on several books.

“Nicaragua: A rebellion at a crossroads”

“After three months of demonstrations, blockades, and street fighting, the Ortega government has succeeded in clearing the roads and driving many dissidents and rebels out of the country, but not at suppressing the revolt entirely.”

“Tyrant: Shakespeare on Politics” by Stephen Greenblatt (2018)

“We learn not simply what Trump tells us about Shakespeare but what Shakespeare tells us about Trump. Illuminating scene after scene, Greenblatt is especially fine on the mechanisms of tyranny.”

“Ortega and the Uprising”

Today, it seems that the regime has swept away the barricades, … and perhaps has begun to quell the three-month uprising, at least for the moment. The international left cannot contribute to a more permanent peace rooted in social justice by providing the regime with a legitimacy that it has squandered in violence.”

“The Town at the Heart of Nicaragua’s Opposition Movement”

“In the past three months, tens of thousands of Nicaraguans have protested against Mr. Ortega’s government. The demonstrations have led to deadly clashes with police and paramilitary forces, killing nearly 300 people, including several officers and many students. Neither side has shown any signs of relenting.”