Category Archives: revolt

CrimethInc.: “Between the Reaction and the Referendum”

“Several questions remain. How can we make sure that the ways we participate in the yellow vest movement and others like it won’t be simply perceived as an “apolitical” expression of anger, giving nationalists a platform to take credit for our efforts? When we act to create a crisis, how do we prevent far right parties from capitalizing on it by promising a return to normal? How do we confront legalist and reactionary ideas within the movement? How should we prepare for the next round, in which we will either face a stronger repressive and authoritarian state or a massive nationalist and reactionary wave? But also—how can we reinforce our connections with everyone else in the streets and traffic circles?”

Julius Gavroche: “The gilets jaunes: Towards a permanent insurrection”

“At the very heart of anarchism is the radical and uncompromising celebration of autonomy. And what is autonomy if not the permanent possibility of refusal and insurrection, of destruction and/or creation.”

Laurence Cox: ‘The revolutionary challenge of “the long 1968”’

“The struggles of 1968 remade the landscape of social movements and popular resistance for decades to come. What do these struggles have to tell us today?”

lundimatin: “The specter of chaos”

“The specter of chaos or anarchy is brandished by those who rule the world and benefit from it. Anarchy and chaos are identified and this identification is an illusion that the negation of order leads to chaos. What is denied by revolt or revolution is not order in general but this particular order.”

‘Temps critiques’: “A yellow costume that creates community”

“If we agree that yellow vests have developed an autonomous movement, we will not go so far as to say that they self-organise themselves in the ideological sense of self-organisation, as conceived by historical councilists or libertarians. It is an immediate self-organisation that leads to nothing but his own immediate practice.”

Raoul Vaneigem interview and “The reasons for the anger” on the gilets jaunes

“Everything is possible, even self-managing assemblies in the middle of street intersections, villages and neighborhoods.”

Étienne Dolet: “Ten lessons from the Yellow Vests”

‘The “yellow vests movement,” which was sparked earlier this fall but clearly has much deeper roots, has left many bewildered by the lack of party or union alignments on the part of the participants, the combination of extreme left and extreme right elements, its remarkable resilience and growth since November, and its ongoing creativity and dynamism in the face of massive state repression.’

Two statements that have appeared amidst the gilets jaunes “movement”

“All contemporary anti-capitalist movements must abandon the self-illusion of being intrinsically opposed to capitalism; whatever such movements may emerge, they will constitute themselves in the very struggle to destroy/escape capital.  The heterogeneity of contemporary social movements also condemns all possibility of representation.  The gilets jaunes possess the virtue of self-consciously embracing this condemnation or refusal.  The question then is what is to follow.”

Jerome Roos: “The Gilets Jaunes have blown up the old political categories”

“While the yellow vest movement — if it can even be properly defined as such — remains inchoate and contradictory in terms of its social composition and ideological orientation, there is little doubt that it has opened up a major fissure in French politics. The neoliberal center finds itself under siege, and the political establishment appears to be at a loss on how to respond.”

“Call from the Yellow Vests of Commercy to set up popular assemblies”

‘Here in Commercy, in the Meuse, we have been operating from the beginning with daily popular assemblies, where each person participates equally. We organized to block entrances to the city and service stations, and filtering road blocks. In the process, we built a cabin in the central square. We meet there every day to organize ourselves, decide next actions, interact with people, and welcome those who join the movement. We also organize “solidarity soups” to live beautiful moments  together and get to know each other. In equality.’