Category Archives: revolution

Kiersten Solt, V.I.: “Seven theses on destitution”

Constituent vs. destituent insurrections

Sumanta Banerjee: “Embers of the Paris Commune”

“This year we are celebrating the 150th anniversary of the Paris Commune of 1871 – the biggest urban insurrection of the nineteenth century, that led to the setting up of a grass roots based popular government in Paris, albeit for only about two months, before it was crushed by the Versailles troops at the end of May that year. But during that brief period of popular sovereignty, that government – known as the `Commune’, meaning the smallest unit of local governance – laid the foundations of a model of decentralization of power, that has continued to inspire generations all over the world.”

Christopher Clark: “The 1848 Revolutions” (2019)

LRB lecture

Tim Bruno: ” Transforming Rebellion into Revolution: Rereading Cedric Robinson and Eugene Genovese”

“Defensiveness about the revolutionary-ness of resistance potentially understates just how much is needed to expand and escalate the rebellious conditions that precede Black liberation. Rereading Robinson and Genovese, it becomes clear how much of the Black Radical Tradition is about historiography—it is a tradition, after all”

The Paris Commune

Franco “Bifo” Berardi

Antonio Negri

Articles on the Paris Commune at 150

The Paris Commune at 150

From the Commune to communalism

The Paris Commune Taught the Bolsheviks How to Win a Revolution

From red scarfs to yellow vests: the communalist tradition

La Commune de Paris

The Paris Commune

Brian Meeks: “How a Revolution on the Tiny Island of Grenada Shook the World”

Revolutions are, inevitably, fraught periods of great danger and uncertainty. At their moment of triumph, the old order is temporarily prostrate, but there remains great hostility to the new regime both internally and internationally. The chances of initial consolidation and success are slim, and the very act of asserting authority in order to survive becomes the definitive and often negative signature of revolution.”

Adom Getachew interviewed on “The Anti-Colonial Revolution”

Radical post-colonial leaders like Kwame Nkrumah and Julius Nyerere didn’t just want independence — they wanted to break the political and economic order that kept the Global South in subjugation.”

Brecht de Smet: “Egypt’s Decade of Revolution and Counterrevolution”

“The fall of the Egyptian dictator, Hosni Mubarak, ten years ago today, was a triumph for popular mobilization. But the revolutionary forces lacked the political organization and vision needed to head off a counterrevolutionary backlash that restored the authoritarian state’s power.”

Robert Solé: “Ten Years of Hope and Blood”

“But in Lebanon, as in Algeria or Sudan, the game is not over. The same can be said of all the countries that have experienced a “Spring”, however fleeting, followed by a counter-revolution. The Arab peoples now know that it is not enough to overthrow an authoritarian regime to achieve democracy. Elsewhere in the world, the road has always been long and painful. Refusing to despair, the most committed or lucid citizens are trying, in Gramsci’s words, to combine the pessimism of intelligence with the optimism of will.”