Category Archives: rights

Paulius Vijeikis: “Revolution in progress: Voices of Belarusians in exile”

The Belarus Revolution started in 2020 after a rigged presidential election. It ended, at least to outward appearances, with President Lukashenka’s brutal repression and stricter outlawing of future protests. But, for many, the struggle continues: a new study on protestors’ recollections refutes the perception that the revolution failed.”

Glenda Gilmore interviewed: “The Civil Rights Movement Was Radical to Its Core”

“Gilmore’s narrative follows a path of struggle through Southern, American, and world histories that links together the Russian Revolution, the rise and fall of fascism, and the “long civil rights movement” in the United States”.

Kris Manjapra: “Juneteenth celebrates just one of the United States’ 20 emancipation days”

“Βetween the 1780s and 1930s, during the era of liberal empire and the rise of modern humanitarianism, over 80 emancipations from slavery occurred, from Pennsylvania in 1780 to Sierra Leone in 1936.  There were, in fact, 20 separate emancipations in the United States alone, from 1780 to 1865, across the U.S. North and South.”

David Palumbo-Liu: “Rise Up in Anger and Hope: How Eruptive Protests Can Propel Urgent Issues to the Center of Political Debate”

“The fact that the protests erupted in cities, suburbs, rural areas, and in every state of the Union inspiring protesters old and young, and of many races, should not be overlooked; nor should the fact that the demonstrations spread beyond our borders, even in the midst of a global pandemic that made public gatherings dangerous.”

Rinaldo Walcott on Riots, Policing, and Traditions of Black Refusal

“The Black riot is a refusal of entrenched policing practices that has boiled over. The riot is an expression of revolt with a historical basis in slavery. In activist circles, riots have been renamed uprisings, thereby giving their actions a deeper meaning. And the difference isn’t merely semantic. Riots often garner the attention of state authorities in a way that so-called peaceful protests do not. The riot, or uprising, is an important element of the quest for Black freedom.”

“Palestinians Are Refusing to Be Trampled”

“Israel was founded on the crime of ethnic cleansing and the principles of apartheid. The country may finally be coming apart at the seams under the weight of its own contradictions.”

Christina Noriega: “Colombian Protesters Are Ready for the Long Haul”

“After nearly two weeks of protests against neoliberal reforms and police violence, Colombia’s conservative government has refused to make any major concessions. The demonstrations continue.”

Seraj Assi: “It’s Obvious — Israel Is an Apartheid State”

‘There are no “clashes” occurring in Jerusalem between Israelis and Palestinians. What we’re seeing is the brutal reality of an occupying power exercising its military might over a people stripped of their human rights.’

Brian Meeks: “How a Revolution on the Tiny Island of Grenada Shook the World”

Revolutions are, inevitably, fraught periods of great danger and uncertainty. At their moment of triumph, the old order is temporarily prostrate, but there remains great hostility to the new regime both internally and internationally. The chances of initial consolidation and success are slim, and the very act of asserting authority in order to survive becomes the definitive and often negative signature of revolution.”

Johnisha Levi: “A Tale of Two Insurrections”

“The Capitol insurrection and the 1898 Wilmington coup share key similarities. They both divided our citizenry between those wanting to guarantee rights for a broader cross section of individuals versus those wanting to restrict them to a privileged few. Both events were also orchestrated from the top down in an attempt to place party above country and to delegitimize our election process. And finally, both instances were perpetuating a so-called Lost Cause.”