Category Archives: tyranny

Samuel Farber: “The Russian Revolution Reconsidered”

“S. A. Smith’s book Russia in Revolution: An Empire in Crisis 1890-1928 … sets out to explain how the 1917 Bolshevik Revolution, inspired by a radical democratic and egalitarian spirit, degenerated into the Stalinist totalitarian regime.”

Michael Braddick: “The people vs tyranny: The secular martyrdom of John Lilburne”

“Lilburne emerged from this world of Reformation politics but expressed his religious conscience in a very different way, based on a sharp distinction between the civil state and the ecclesiastical state.”

Robert D. Taber & Charlton W. Yingling: “Free Communities of Color in the Revolutionary Caribbean”

“Our new book, Free Communities of Color in the Revolutionary Caribbean: Overturning, or Turning Back?, brings together emerging and established scholars to explore meanings of community and belonging for people of color in the late Age of Atlantic Revolutions, not just in Haiti or the British Atlantic, but also Caracas, Cartagena, the Dutch and Swedish Caribbean, and the European metropole.”

“The Photos that Captured the First Day of the Soviet Invasion of Czechoslovakia”

August 21, 1968 at the Czech Center New York features 20 images of dynamic photo-reportage capturing the first day of the Soviet Invasion of Czechoslovakia.”

Rebecca Solnit: “All the Rage: What a literature that embraces female anger can achieve”

“Instead of a theory of male anger, we have a growing literature in essays and now books about female anger, a phenomenon in transition.” Rebecca Solnit on three new books about women’s anger.

Dilar Dirik: “Women’s Internationalism against Global Patriarchy”

“From the earliest rebellions in history to the first organized women’s strikes, protests and movements, struggling women have always acted in the consciousness that their resistance is linked to wider issues of injustice and oppression in society.  Whether in the fight against colonialism, religious dogma, militarism, industrialism, state authority or capitalist modernity, historically women’s movements have mobilized the experience of different aspects of oppression and the need for a fight on multiple fronts.”

“Nicaragua: A rebellion at a crossroads”

“After three months of demonstrations, blockades, and street fighting, the Ortega government has succeeded in clearing the roads and driving many dissidents and rebels out of the country, but not at suppressing the revolt entirely.”

“What is Happening in Nicaragua Right Now?”

“Nonviolent civil disobedience relies first and foremost on the will of its proponents not to take up arms, and this will seems unbreakable. This is why we must open our eyes to what is happening in Nicaragua. If a transition from dictatorship to democracy can be achieved without a civil war, we will avoid the risk—so often a reality—that from the country’s ruins a new tyrant will rise up to take the place of the tyrant who was violently overthrown.  Achieving change through a civilian uprising will allow us, for the first time, to build stable institutions, develop an independent judicial system, and choose a new government in free and transparent elections. Then we will finally be on the path to modernity.”

“Tyrant: Shakespeare on Politics” by Stephen Greenblatt (2018)

“We learn not simply what Trump tells us about Shakespeare but what Shakespeare tells us about Trump. Illuminating scene after scene, Greenblatt is especially fine on the mechanisms of tyranny.”

John Ferling: “Forget a new civil war. We need a new American revolution.”

“More than 200 years later, the United States may well be losing the American Revolution.”