Category Archives: tyranny

“From #MeToo to #WeStrike”

“What can the #MeToo movement learn from Latin American feminists? How can a global perspective help develop new insights into forms of violence and create a politics that challenges the fundamental basis of gender inequality?”

“Kurdish women’s movement makes a historic call to women across the world”

“From the mountains of Kurdistan, in the lands where society developed with the leadership of women, we salute you with our great freedom, passion, ambition, and unbreakable struggle. From Rojava’s neighborhoods to South America’s forests, from Europe’s streets to Africa’s plains, from the Middle East’s valleys to North America’s plazas, from Asia’s mountains to Australia’s plateaus; with our love which knows no borders and with our most revolutionary feelings, we embrace all women who intensify the struggle for freedom and equality.”

Stephanie Abraham: “Indicting the System”

Khan-Cullors’s book, When They Call You a Terrorist: A Black Lives Matter Memoir, co-written with author and journalist asha bandele, “is about Patrisse Khan-Cullors as much as it is about our current moment, wherein Black people, Muslims, the mentally ill, immigrants, women, trans folks, and others are one fender bender away from being beaten and charged with terrorism. The authors make clear that each of us needs to answer the question: what will I do when they call me a terrorist — because who among us won’t be?”

Chris Lebron: “Who First Showed Us That Black Lives Matter?”

“Thinkers like Wells, Hughes, Hurston, Lorde and Baldwin not only anticipated the current Black Lives Matter movement but provided an intellectual blueprint to give depth and integrity to that slogan, so that its meaning transcends the demand to stop police brutality.”

Karim Sadjadpour: “The Battle for Iran”

“Two-thousand-five-hundred years of Persian civilization and a century-long quest for democracy offer hope about the irrepressible Iranian will for change. But the Islamic Republic’s four-decade history of brutality suggests that change will not come easily, or peacefully, or soon.”

“All the President’s Shakespeare”

“What Trump administration officials would you cast in Macbeth?”

Yoav Haifawi: “Democratic Confederalism and the Palestinian Experience”

“While in most Arab countries the left is in a prolonged retreat, we see how the Kurdish left succeeded to establish itself as the dominant force between the Kurdish masses in most of Kurdistan, even as it is divided between different nation-states. This makes the study of the Kurdish experience and of the revolutionary theory that inspires it an essential effort for Palestinian and Arab activists looking for new agenda for liberation from Imperialism, Zionism and local tyrannies.”

“Robert Mugabe Resigns as Zimbabwe’s President, Ending 37-Year Rule”

“While Mr. Mugabe’s resignation caused immediate jubilation in the streets, for many the reaction was more complex. Mr. Mugabe had occupied a central role in the nation’s four-decade history and in its founding mythology, which all Zimbabweans are taught in primary school. He was a tyrant, many said, but he was also the nation’s father figure.”

Harrison Fluss: “Hegel on Bastille Day”

“After the Reign of Terror and the fall of Robespierre, Hegel took a more somber and often times very critical view of Jacobinism in his later Jena period, right through to the publication of his masterwork, the Phenomenology of Spirit. But it is important to understand how Hegel understood the Jacobins’ role as not entirely retrogressive, but progressive to the development of human freedom, or what Hegel calls the development of human spirit in history.”

J. Oliver Conroy: “The far right: They hate the US government, and they’re multiplying: the terrifying rise of ‘sovereign citizens'”

“While US counter-terrorism efforts remain locked on Islamist extremism, the growing threat from homegrown, right-wing extremists is even more pressing.”