Category Archives: violence

Hall Greenland: “After Independence, Algeria Launched an Experiment in Self-Managing Socialism”

Local democracy wasn’t always perfect: there were many examples of local bigwigs, mafia, and armed mujahideen doing side deals with emigrating European owners or seizing European property. However, in the latter cases, there were often ongoing struggles between the usurpers and local workers for control.  The spontaneous reality of the summer of 1962 set the stage for the struggle that was to dominate the next three years: direct democracy versus bureaucratic and bourgeois control. To put it another way: the people against a nascent ruling class.”

Casey Harison: “The Crowd in History and the January 6, 2021 Attack on the US Capitol”

“Indeed, for those familiar with the history of crowds, January 6 has real similarities with a pattern of collective action that happened across the Atlantic World dating from the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.”

Ethan Oversby & Benjamin Maiangwa: “Thomas Sankara, Intersectionality and the Fate of Africa’s Liberation”

Thomas Sankara is relevant today as a Marxist revolutionary, and a martyr to those inspired by his subaltern resistance to what bell hooks calls the “white supremacist capitalist patriarchy”; an “interlocking system of domination” that exist between the west and the rest of the world. Sankara’s legacy is particularly felt among the younger generation in Africa and elsewhere who are becoming increasingly dissatisfied with exploitative capitalism, the kleptocracy of their leaders and other planetary crises.’

Amir Ahmadi Arian: “Without them: In Iran, a revolution of the mind has already taken place”

“How can you tell if a society is in a revolutionary state? I wonder if you ever can. Everyone who remembers the 1979 revolution will tell you that up to the very last day, most people were living their lives as if nothing was happening. Iran today is not different. Intense, bloody clashes between protestors and the police are interspersed with days of calm. Everyday life goes on at the same time as massive protests. If you go out on the street, you can collect evidence for both an imminent revolution and total peace.”

Basil Adra: “A day of civil disobedience in Shuafat Refugee Camp”

“Days into a near-total lockdown imposed by Israel, Palestinian residents of the East Jerusalem camp staged a mass strike and protest, only to be attacked by security forces.”

David Hamblin: “We Are All Spartacus”

“Why has the story of Spartacus become important to leftists over the years? Because Spartacus showed what it would take for people to liberate themselves from violent systems of oppression.”

Alyssa Goldstein Sepinwall: “Thoroughly Modern Maxie: Robespierre’s Relevance for Democracy Today”

“But Robespierre’s challenge remains relevant today: what can we do now, in the face of furious backlash from those who oppose #BlackLivesMatter, feminism, and other social movements, to confront those who would rather deform democracy than see society become more just and egalitarian?”

Malcolm Nance: “The Republican Party Now Backs an Anti-Democratic Insurgency”

“By 2021, Trump transformed moderate republicanism into an openly radical fascist party advocating the elimination of democracy.”

Joe Stelios: “Remembering Che Guevara”

“Today, there are many revolutionaries, organisations, and governments that draw inspiration from Che’s legacy. The Zapatistas in Chiapas and the YPG in Rojava have both cited his work during their fights for autonomy.”

Rinaldo Walcott on Riots, Policing, and Traditions of Black Refusal

“The Black riot is a refusal of entrenched policing practices that has boiled over. The riot is an expression of revolt with a historical basis in slavery. In activist circles, riots have been renamed uprisings, thereby giving their actions a deeper meaning. And the difference isn’t merely semantic. Riots often garner the attention of state authorities in a way that so-called peaceful protests do not. The riot, or uprising, is an important element of the quest for Black freedom.”