Category Archives: Žižek

Jamil Khader: “Liberal Politics and the Challenge of White Supremacy: Anti-anti-Eurocentrism and the Question of Identity Politics”

‘Liberal and leftist commentators thus need to draw the ultimate radical conclusion from this anti-anti-Eurocentric position: The struggle for racial justice must be grounded in a dialectical materialist understanding of “the gap” between the particular and the universal which, according to the Slovenian philosopher Slavoj Žižek, not only destabilizes identity from within, but also serves as the foundation for a true universality. Žižek’s crucial point here is that identities should be taken up on the promise of actualizing this immanent universal dimension that was opened up precisely through the brutal history of genocide, slavery, colonialism, internment, etc.’

Luke Mergner: Review of Jodi Dean’s “Crowds and Party” (2016)

On collectives and the suspension of the individual ego:  ‘Dean judges Occupy, in which she participated, and other global protest movements to have failed. … How should the Left organize political movements to avoid the traps of neoliberal subjectivity?  Dean’s central themes are announced in the title: crowds and party. … She seems to exhort us: Look at how crowds let us transcend our individuality and difference. Look at how crowds demonstrate a collective will. … Using Occupy as her example, she argues that crowds cannot survive long enough to create real political change. … An “affective infrastructure” drives her description of the party and the romanticism that colors it. It is the ability to subsume individuals into a collective that links the crowd and the party.’