Tag Archives: Algeria

“A new Arab Spring?”

“East London rs21 held a meeting in May 2019 on the uprisings in Algeria, Sudan and Morocco. The speakers discussed the movements demanding change, the counter-revolutionary forces lining up against them, and the role of international solidarity.

“In solidarity with the Sudan revolution”

“After months of protests, strikes, occupations, the Sudanese state has unleashed a wave of repression against the insurrection. Yet even in face of this terror, millions have now joined a general strike to bring down the regime.  Rebellions are contagious, and with Algeria also in revolt, the region’s authoritarians sense fear; the moment when everything becomes possible.”

David D. Kirkpatrick: “Hopes Raised during the Arab Spring are being Revived Across North Africa”

“The hopes inspired by the Arab Spring uprisings of 2011 soured long ago. But across North Africa, the reverberations are coursing through the region once again, shaking autocratic governments and posing new questions about the future.  Veterans of the Arab Spring struggles say the scenes feel like flashbacks to chapters of a common story. …  But the setbacks and disillusionment are familiar as well.”

Hamza Hamouchene: ‘Algeria in revolt: “We woke up and you will pay!”’

“What is happening in Algeria is truly historic. The people won the first battle in their struggle to radically overhaul the system. Abdelaziz Bouteflika, president for the past twenty years, was forced to abdicate after more than six weeks of street protests and a re-configuration of alliances within the ruling classes.

lundi matin: “The street belongs to us. The street is us.”

“The Algerian protests have swelled into a mass rebellion against against an authoritarian, rentier capitalism that seemed to have been frozen in time.”

The history of anticolonial internationalism

Jeffrey James Byrne:  Mecca of Revolution: Algeria, Decolonization, and the Third World Order (Oxford 2016).  “It argues that the Third World movement evolved from a subversive transnational phenomenon in the late-colonial era into a diplomatic collaboration among postcolonial elites to exalt state sovereignty and national authority.”