Tag Archives: Egypt

David D. Kirkpatrick: “Hopes Raised during the Arab Spring are being Revived Across North Africa”

“The hopes inspired by the Arab Spring uprisings of 2011 soured long ago. But across North Africa, the reverberations are coursing through the region once again, shaking autocratic governments and posing new questions about the future.  Veterans of the Arab Spring struggles say the scenes feel like flashbacks to chapters of a common story. …  But the setbacks and disillusionment are familiar as well.”

Sara Salem: “Trajectories of Anticolonialism in Egypt”

“The forms of solidarity imagined by radical groups such as Egyptian feminists, workers, and students often broke free of the exclusionary imaginary of the nation state that always came back to exert itself on the articulations of leaders and state representatives. While both ends of this spectrum within anticolonial movements called for decolonization that was global, the ways in which they imagined this was vastly different.”

“The Failure of Egypt’s Revolution”

Steve Negus reviews Into the Hands of Soldiers: Freedom and Chaos in Egypt and the Middle East by David D. Kirkpatrick (2018)

Aidan Beatty: “Social Revolutions Beyond the Volga: Egypt and Ireland”

‘Indeed, as Immanuel Wallerstein has noted, revolution is a term that connotes “sudden, dramatic, and extensive change.  It emphasizes discontinuity.”  Yet, when many scholars come to study “revolutions,” what they often end up studying are the much slower, long-term social changes, that feed into ostensibly sudden rupture with the past. This has led Wallerstein to query the analytic utility of such a slippery and contradictory term.[9]  At the very least, the study of a revolution should not be divorced from the formative events of preceding decades.