Tag Archives: Nicaragua

“Nicaragua: A rebellion at a crossroads”

“After three months of demonstrations, blockades, and street fighting, the Ortega government has succeeded in clearing the roads and driving many dissidents and rebels out of the country, but not at suppressing the revolt entirely.”

“What is Happening in Nicaragua Right Now?”

“Nonviolent civil disobedience relies first and foremost on the will of its proponents not to take up arms, and this will seems unbreakable. This is why we must open our eyes to what is happening in Nicaragua. If a transition from dictatorship to democracy can be achieved without a civil war, we will avoid the risk—so often a reality—that from the country’s ruins a new tyrant will rise up to take the place of the tyrant who was violently overthrown.  Achieving change through a civilian uprising will allow us, for the first time, to build stable institutions, develop an independent judicial system, and choose a new government in free and transparent elections. Then we will finally be on the path to modernity.”

“Ortega and the Uprising”

Today, it seems that the regime has swept away the barricades, … and perhaps has begun to quell the three-month uprising, at least for the moment. The international left cannot contribute to a more permanent peace rooted in social justice by providing the regime with a legitimacy that it has squandered in violence.”

“In Just a Week, ‘Nicaragua Changed’ as Protesters Cracked a Leader’s Grip”

“The revolutionary, many Nicaraguans say, is suddenly facing a revolution of his own.”

Edgardo Lander on ‘The “unconditional solidarity” of the Left with Chavismo’

The Left’s uncritical support for Left authoritarianism:  “The rather authoritarian profile of Chavismo was something that was there from the beginning. And the same applies to the extractivist productive model that has been implemented.  So, why shouldn’t we open a debate on all these things, in order to think critically and make proposals? I’m not implying that the European left should come to tell us, the Venezuelans, how we should carry out a revolution, but I reject the uncritical celebration or justification of anything that might be wrong. … If we understand the struggle for anti-capitalist transformation not as a struggle that takes place ‘down there’ and that therefore we should be supportive of what ‘they’ do, but as a struggle of all of us, then we should be aware that what you might be doing wrong might be affecting us too, and that we’re also responsible for learning from that experience in order not to repeat the same mistake.  But I’m afraid we have no ability to learn, because when the Venezuelan model collapses, we’ll look elsewhere. That kind of solidarity, that kind of internationalism, in terms of political and intellectual responsibility is a disaster.”