Tag Archives: Occupy

Warren Breckman: “Can the Crowd Speak?”

Occupy Wall Street shows that the constituent moment of democracy should include more than merely bodies gathered in public space; that the collective voice is not discovered but invented; that the spectacle of mass gathering and bodies in motion should give way to talking and listening; and that, if the crowd is to speak in a democratic voice, then that voice must be both singular and plural.”

Nicholas Levis: “Three Lessons of Occupy Wall Street, with a Fair Dose of Memory”

‘The story I wish to write now instead is not about how OWS was the beginning of “the movement,” but to identify three reasons why it was one of the most effective catalysts for social justice movements in decades.’

Luke Mergner: Review of Jodi Dean’s “Crowds and Party” (2016)

On collectives and the suspension of the individual ego:  ‘Dean judges Occupy, in which she participated, and other global protest movements to have failed. … How should the Left organize political movements to avoid the traps of neoliberal subjectivity?  Dean’s central themes are announced in the title: crowds and party. … She seems to exhort us: Look at how crowds let us transcend our individuality and difference. Look at how crowds demonstrate a collective will. … Using Occupy as her example, she argues that crowds cannot survive long enough to create real political change. … An “affective infrastructure” drives her description of the party and the romanticism that colors it. It is the ability to subsume individuals into a collective that links the crowd and the party.’

“Occupy Is Everywhere”

“From Standing Rock to Chicago, Los Angeles to New York, today’s movements return again and again to the tactic of holding space, building community, and caring for one another in public.”

https://newrepublic.com/article/137512/occupy-everywhere